Seamers suffer burnout after 1 or 2 years, Pakistan player blames poor fitness and diet

Hasan Ali said Pakistan seamers suffer burnout after one or two years due to poor fitness and diet

Pakistan seamer Hasan Ali: “As a consequence of not working in a professional environment regarding our fitness and diet and conditioning, we suffer burnout after a year or two”

Image courtesy of: Zimbio

Pakistan pace bowler Hasan Ali believes that seamers in the country suffer burnout after one or two years due to their poor fitness levels and diets.

He noted that “young pace bowlers are playing catch-up compared with their counterparts around the world when it comes to fitness levels”.

In addition to this, the 26-year-old pointed out that things like a player’s diet, training and amount of rest are all overlooked.

“I started playing in the Under-16s in 2009 and I didn’t practice in any academy. I practiced with my brother and then moved into Under-19 cricket and never practiced with any qualified cricket coaches,” he told PakPassion. “It’s only when I first toured Australia that I started doing gym work and actually focusing on my fitness, strength and conditioning.

“Prior to that tour of Australia, I had no idea what a gym was or how it could help me as a professional cricketer. There is a problem in our cricket culture and system wherein we overlook the non-playing side of cricket such as diet, training, looking after your body and ensuring you get enough rest.

“What then happens is that our young pace bowlers are playing catch-up compared with their counterparts around the world when it comes to fitness levels. So, as a consequence of not working in a professional environment regarding our fitness and diet and conditioning, we suffer burnout after a year or two.

“There needs to be more Under-16 and Under-19 academies where the youngsters are actually taught about what they can expect from international cricket, about yo-yo tests, about the importance of fitness, the importance of strength and conditioning and about the importance of diet.

“This has to be done by good coaches who are willing to turn players into very good players. At the moment too many young pace bowlers are coming into cricket without a basic understanding of the off-field requirements and as a result they perform for a year or two and then are nowhere to be seen.”

Hasan made his comeback from recurring back injuries in the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, where he captained Central Punjab.

He finished as the fourth-highest wicket-taker in the competition with 43 wickets in nine matches at an average of 20.06.

With the number of wickets he claimed, Hasan had the most wickets among pace bowlers in this year’s Quaid-e-Azam Trophy.

He also got the job done with the bat in the final against Khyber Pakhtunkhwa as he smashed an unbeaten 106, which came off 61 balls and included 10 boundaries and seven sixes.

His efforts nearly helped Central Punjab defend their title, but instead, the match ended as a tie and the trophy was shared between the two teams.

The 26-year-old was rewarded for his strong performance in the Quaid-e-Azam Trophy as he was picked for Pakistan’s upcoming series against South Africa.

Hasan is now set to play his first international match since the 2019 World Cup.

Pakistan’s series against South Africa, which will consist of two Tests and three T20 Internationals, will start on January 26 and conclude on February 14.

Pakistan’s squad for the South Africa series: Abid Ali, Abdullah Shafique, Imran Butt, Azhar Ali, Babar Azam (captain), Fawad Alam, Kamran Ghulam, Agha Salman, Saud Shakeel, Faheem Ashraf, Mohammad Nawaz, Mohammad Rizwan (vice-captain), Sarfaraz Ahmed, Nauman Ali, Sajid Khan, Yasir Shah, Haris Rauf, Hasan Ali, Shaheen Shah Afridi, Tabish Khan

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