Didn’t suck up to the coaches, Pakistan talent says competitors had strong influence and ensured he wasn’t viewed favourably

Pakistan batsman Sami Aslam said he didn't suck up to the coaches

Pakistan batsman Sami Aslam: “I have always relied on my on-field performances rather than sucking-up to coaches or team management for no reason”

Image courtesy of: Zimbio

Pakistan batsman Sami Aslam said he refused to suck up to the coaches for no reason and blamed his competitors for ensuring he wasn’t viewed favourably.

Aslam noted that his competitors had “strong influence” and didn’t want to see him succeed as they knew “it would be difficult to drop me”.

Aslam, who has moved to America, last represented Pakistan in October 2017, but was one of the top performers in domestic cricket in 2019.

In the 2019 Quaid-e-Azam Trophy, he was the fourth-highest run-scorer with 864 runs in 10 matches for Southern Punjab, which included four centuries and a fifty, at an average of 78.54.

In the 2020 tournament, he accumulated 141 runs in three games for Balochistan, which included a half-century, at an average of 23.50.

“I wasn’t one of those players who would keep phoning the coach and praising him. I have always relied on my on-field performances rather than sucking-up to coaches or team management for no reason,” the 25-year-old told PakPassion.

“In addition, some of my competitors had a strong influence off the field and ensured that I wasn’t looked at favourably. They knew that if they gave me a proper chance and if I succeeded then it would be difficult to drop me and subsequently their spot in the playing eleven would be in jeopardy.”

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