Pakistan seamer Mohammad Amir gives tips on being a great bowler and taking wickets

Mohammad Amir provides tips on being a great bowler and taking wickets Pakistan cricket

Mohammad Amir: “Being a bowler I will simplify my plans in such situations. You have to know your strengths in tense situations”

Image courtesy of: ESPNcricinfo

Pakistan left-arm seamer Mohammad Amir has revealed that in order to be a great bowler and take wickets, one must plan properly and stick to their strengths.

Amir noted that if he is bowling in the death overs, he will assess the pitch and conditions before formulating a plan and deciding what type of deliveries he thinks will get him wickets.

The 27-year-old also admitted that he loves the challenge of being a bowler, especially in Twenty20 cricket, which he believes is dominated by batsmen.

“Being a bowler I will simplify my plans in such situations. You have to know your strengths in tense situations,” he was quoted as saying by Cricfrenzy. “For example, if I am bowling at the death overs then I need to know the condition and demand of the wicket. If I think I will be able to bowl two or three yorkers then I have to stick to that plan. When you stick to your strengths it releases a lot of pressure.

“Now in T20s people come to watch sixes and fours and if you have noticed T20 cricket, the crowd all over the world, they don’t come to see dismissals, rather sixes and fours, to enjoy and [be entertained], and I think it’s fair.

“As a bowler, I really enjoy to play the batter’s game, which T20 cricket is considered to be, you can bowl well in seaming conditions, but how you deal in such conditions tests the mental toughness of a bowler.

“Sometimes it happens under pressure. Mostly 99 percent of the time I do my planning, and what to do in the next over when the other bowler is bowling in the middle. But if you think what to do in the middle of an over then it will put you under tremendous pressure.

“But when I am not bowling, I try to think about what I can do during that period. Ultimately, I know when I will have the ball in my hand, in the next over I know what I am going to do and it actually releases the pressure.”

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