Hughes’ death is something I will remember for the rest of my life, says David Warner

"There were serious thoughts there about pulling out of the Test; I didn't want to play"

“There were serious thoughts there about pulling out of the Test; I didn’t want to play”

Image courtesy of: Zimbio

Australia opener David Warner has revealed that he will never forget the day that his team-mate and close friend Phillip Hughes passed away at the age of 25.

Warner was playing for New South Wales when Hughes, who was representing South Australia, was struck on the side of the neck by a bouncer. Due to the severe injuries he sustained, Hughes died in hospital two days later.

“When I look back and reflect on it, you almost knew then and there that we had to be prepared for the worst,” Warner was quoted as saying by cricket.com.au on Wednesday. “Holding his hand as we rode together in the medicab, and how I saw him on the field, it’s not what I wanted my last image of him to be.”

Warner, who scored two centuries in Australia’s¬†emotional 48-run win over India in the first Test in Adelaide, also admitted that he came so close to not playing in that match.

“I spent almost nine hours on the golf course and at the driving range the day after Hughes died, just contemplating what was going to happen to myself,” he said. “I was speaking to my fiancee Candice about the Adelaide match a lot and I can’t thank her enough for her support.

“There were serious thoughts there about pulling out of the Test; I didn’t want to play.”

However, since the match was in honour of Hughes, Warner knew that he had to¬†“get out there and do it for my mate”.

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