ICC lays down the law on Mankading

"The cricket committee believes that a non-striker should be deterred from leaving his or her crease before the time the bowler normally delivers the ball"

“The cricket committee believes that a non-striker should be deterred from leaving his or her crease before the time the bowler normally delivers the ball”

Image courtesy of: Zimbio

After England wicketkeeper Jos Buttler became the first batsman to be Mankaded in an international match since 1992, the International Cricket Council (ICC) have laid down the law on the controversial dismissal.

The incident occurred during the fifth ODI in Edgbaston when Buttler was warned twice before being given out after spinner Sachithra Senanayake Mankaded him.

 

The ICC’s cricket committee believe that non-strikers need to stop gaining unfair advantages by walking down the pitch before the bowler has completed his his bowling action.

The cricket committee also noted that on-field umpires do not need to ask the captain if he wants to uphold the appeal after a batsman has been Mankaded.

“The cricket committee believes that a non-striker should be deterred from leaving his or her crease before the time the bowler normally delivers the ball,” the committee said via a statement. “It did not support a formal warning being introduced prior to a bowler being eligible to run out a non-striker, but it did support the view expressed by some captains that the umpires shouldn’t ask the captain whether he wanted the appeal to stand before making a final decision. The Law strikes a sensible balance between preventing a batsman from gaining an advantage whilst at the same time preventing the bowler from unfairly seducing the batsman into leaving his crease by faking to deliver and then holding on to the ball.”

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