‘From our end, we are trying to get as much pace and bounce as we can’, says Damian Hough

Image courtesy of: dailytelegraph.com.au

“We will look at leaving a little grass on it just to assist with making it a competitive wicket”

The curator of the Adelaide Oval, Damian Hough, has announced that his ground staff are doing everything in their power to ensure the pitch has “as much pace and bounce” as possible in order to calm fears that bowlers will struggle to take wickets.

“We are planning to have something early,” Hough told the Herald Sun. “From our end, we are trying to get as much pace and bounce as we can.

“We will look at leaving a little grass on it just to assist with making it a competitive wicket.”

Reminiscing about the last time he played in Adelaide, England pace bowler Stuart Broad stated that it was of the utmost importance for the batsmen to get a big score on the board.

“Adelaide is a place you need to score big first-innings runs and we’ll be aiming to do what we did last time and we’re very focused on that,” Broad said.

Broad also knows what the ramifications could potentially be if England were to lose the second Test in Adelaide.

“Adelaide will be a huge Test match, to get back into the series, but we have confidence and experience we can do that,” he said. “We have a group of players who are strong. They know when they’ve made mistakes and (need to) put them right.”

Australia left-arm pace bowler Mitchell Johnson, who received the Man of the Match award for his nine wickets in the first Test in Brisbane, revealed that he was going to continue using short-pitched deliveries to trouble the English batsmen.

“I’ll still come in with the short ball because it is up and down in Adelaide, so it makes it even harder I think,” he said. “At the Gabba, you know it’s a true bounce. But Adelaide is not true bounce. So I think that makes it a lot more difficult to play the short ball, and obviously reverse swing comes in to it as well.

“I don’t like facing bouncers. No one does. When the ball’s coming past your nose on a fast wicket, it’s never nice.

“I’m not sure if it’s fear (in the minds of the English batsmen) but I’ll definitely continue to use it, because it definitely worked in Brisbane.”

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