It will be hard to convince some Australian players to play the first Test, says Nasser Hussain

"To ask guys like Haddin, Lyon and Watson, who were playing in the game and holding their dying friend on the SCG turf, to strap on their pads might be asking too much"

“To ask guys like Haddin, Lyon and Watson, who were playing in the game and holding their dying friend on the SCG turf, to strap on their pads might be asking too much”

Image courtesy of: ESPNcricinfo

Following the tragic death of Australia batsman Phillip Hughes, former England captain Nasser Hussain has announced that it will be hard to convince some of the Australian players to represent their country in the first Test against India in Brisbane.

However, there are doubts about whether the first Test will go ahead as planned or whether it will be postponed to a later date.

Hughes passed away at the age of 25 after he was struck on the side of the neck by a bouncer from New South Wales pace bowler Sean Abbott.

“It will be very, very difficult in a week’s time with all the emotion so it has got to be a real individual decision from the Australia players,” Hussain said. “To ask guys like Haddin, Lyon and Watson, who were playing in the game and holding their dying friend on the SCG turf, to strap on their pads might be asking too much.

“But they may want to play as a tribute to Phillip Hughes and make it a Test match for him. I don’t think anyone could complain with whatever decision those cricketers make.

“We had a similar thing a long time ago in New Zealand when we came off at lunchtime to hear the news that Ben Hollioake had died in a car crash.

“We were all absolutely gutted by it and some of the Surrey boys, Graham Thorpe and Mark Butcher in particular, almost couldn’t carry on.”

Hussain also paid tribute to Hughes, saying: “He had a real fighting spirit. He didn’t always have the greatest technique but that didn’t bother him and he always came back for more. He wasn’t someone who’d give up easily and he was on the verge of another call-up.

“I didn’t really know him personally but if you speak to anyone, whether here in England, where he played for a few counties, or in Australia, there are people hurting.

“He was a lovely lad – you can tell that by reading social media and listening to the tributes.”

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