Queensland recieves $4 million grant

"In an era where kids are spoilt for choice with sporting options, we have to work harder than ever before to attract them to our game"

“In an era where kids are spoilt for choice with sporting options, we have to work harder than ever before to attract them to our game”

Image courtesy of: ESPNcricinfo

Cricket Australia have given Queensland $4 million as part of their new governance structure and financial distribution scheme.

Queensland will use the money to help develop and strengthen the sport in the northern part of Australia. They will also use the funds to hire five new market development officers, a regional cricket manager and cricket officer, both of whom will be based in Townsville.

“Queensland has a proud tradition of producing top cricket talent and has an incredible record in state cricket over the past two to three decades,” Cricket Australia chief executive James Sutherland said. “But in an era where kids are spoilt for choice with sporting options, we have to work harder than ever before to attract them to our game.

“That means arming Queensland Cricket with the right human and financial resources to really promote and enhance the game at grassroots level throughout that state. Our analysis found that despite Queensland’s population, geographic size and strong growth forecasts, Queensland Cricket didn’t have the people or funds at hand to make gains where it matters most.

“These funds will go a long way towards building a stronger and more sustainable participation base delivered by a stronger Queensland Cricket.”

Queensland Cricket’s chief executive Geoff Cockerill stated that he intends to use the money to encourage more youngsters to start playing cricket.

“This major level of investment is a great result for cricket, strengthening our position in South East Queensland and especially in the regional areas of the State which is where continued growth at the grassroots level is vital to the overall health of cricket,” he said. “The funding goes directly to getting staff working at the coalface and will make a significant difference in the short- to medium-term. It will help us with the physical and logistical challenges that Queensland, as a big State with a large proportion of its population residing outside the south-east corner, faces each day.”

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