A BATTING WITH BIMAL BREAKING REPORT: ICC announce new and improved international cricket laws

The new laws took effect on October 30 2012

The International Cricket Council’s (ICC) new and improved international cricketing laws have already come into effect, with Sri Lanka and New Zealand being the first two teams to play under them.

The improvements to the laws were approved the the council after proposals were made by the ICC Cricket Committee in a meeting in May.

The amendments to the Decision Review System (DRS) are as follows: “If a ‘not out’ decision is being reviewed, in order to report that the point of impact is between wicket and wicket (i.e. in line with the stumps), the evidence provided by technology should show that the centre of the ball at the moment of interception is in line within an area demarcated by a line drawn below the lower edge of the bails and down the middle of the outer stumps. If an ‘out’ decision is being reviewed, in order to report that the point of impact is not between wicket and wicket (i.e. outside the line of the stumps), the evidence provided by technology should show that no part of the ball at the moment of interception is between wicket and wicket.”

The rules for checking of no-balls by the third umpire has also been changed.

“Following any mode of dismissal that is not permitted off a no-ball and which is not the subject of an Umpire or Player Review, the third umpire shall, subject to the availability of suitable technology, immediately check the fairness of the delivery (foot-fault only). If the delivery was not a fair delivery, the third umpire shall advise the on-field umpire by two-way radio who should recall the dismissed batsman, indicate that the batsman is not out and signal no-ball.

“If suitable technology is not available to the third umpire, then if the on-field umpire is uncertain as the fairness of the delivery (foot-fault only), he shall be entitled to request the batsman to delay leaving the field and to check the fairness of the delivery (foot-fault only) with the third umpire. Consultation with the third umpire shall be by way of two way radio. If the delivery was not a fair delivery the on-field umpire shall indicate that the batsman is not-out and signal no-ball.”

Clause 23.4, which is the umpires calling and signalling of a dead-ball now reads as: “In a match where Spydercam is being used, either umpire shall call and signal ‘dead ball’, should a ball that has been hit by the batsman make contact, while still in play, with the Spydercam or its cable. The ball shall not count as one of the over and no runs shall be scored.”

The ICC have also decided to grant time to the bowling side if the batting side are wasting time under clause 16.2 (d), thus meaning that when the batting side bowl, they will have less time to complete all their allotted overs.

Recently, the ICC gave the green light for day-night Test matches to take place, but under the new rules, it is up to the two individual cricket boards to finalise whether the decision to play a day-night Test is in their best interests or not.

In terms of intervals, as of right now they remain unchanged at 40 and 20 minutes respectively under Clause 15.1, but both teams can apply to the ICC to grant them intervals of 30 minutes each instead.

There have been changes to the Powerplays and fielding restrictions in ODIs, whereby instead of three powerplays, there will now be two.

The first Powerplay will be restricted to the first 10 overs and only two fielders can remain outside the 30-yard circle.

The second five-over batting Powerplay will have to be taken and completed by the 40th over and only three fielders will be allowed outside the 30-yard circle.

In non-Powerplay overs, only four fielders are allowed to remain outside the 30-yard circle.

In terms of short-pitched deliveries, the ICC have amended the rules, whereby “a bowler shall be limited to two fast short-pitched deliveries per over.”

In a rule that only applies to Twenty20 Internationals, when a game has to be decided by a super over eliminator, the fielding side can choose which ball they would like to use from the box of spare balls provided by the umpire, while also being able to select which end they would like to bowl from.

For over-rate time allowances, in addition to Clause 16.2, which is the Minimum Over-Rates, the ICC have decided to allocate an additional one minute following the sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth wickets.

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